J.J. Joseph Sharp
Without a doubt, the ability to connect the dots is rare, prized and valuable. Connecting dots, solving the problem that hasn’t been solved before, seeing the pattern before it is made obvious, is more essential than ever before. Why then, do we spend so much time collecting dots instead? More facts, more tests, more need for data, even when we have no clue (and no practice) in doing anything with it.
Though the road is rocky it sure feels good to me.
Bob Marley

busket:

Ghost Girl (by Kevin Francis Gray)

Via

man but this photoset ignores some of my favorite things about this piece

like this

and this

it gives it more of a story i think

Halloween 2014

Halloween 2014

He’ll grab your waist and whisper in your ear but six months later you’ll find yourself drunk texting him that you miss him and he won’t respond.
(via sureth-ng)
The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who’ll get me a book I ain’t read.
Abraham Lincoln (via observando)

Mystery of the Widow’s Son - The Legend of the Craft (by michaelrose93)

A good book is an event in my life.
Stendhal, The Red and the Black (via observando)
So many feels! WHAT AN AMAZING SHOW


GIRLS: Is Hannah Saying Goodbye to New York?

So many feels! WHAT AN AMAZING SHOW


GIRLS: Is Hannah Saying Goodbye to New York?

thanks, joe

thanks, joe

SPIKE, BROOKLYN & ME: The thin line between love and hate in gentrified Brooklyn

jamiefreybrooklyn:

image

If you can believe it, I’m tired of talking about gentrification. I spent many of my formative years protesting and ranting about The Atlantic Yards Project (the monstrosity that spawned The Barclays Center, The Brooklyn Nets etc.), the changes in Williamsburg and Bushwick (the neighborhood I now reside,) and all things “hipster.” I wrote songs and essays about it, guilted out my poor colleagues at the Pratt Institute, and did all I could to stand in direct opposition. I felt ownership of Brooklyn and wanted to make some kind of glitch in the mechanisms of change. I wanted to be a voice of the native Brooklynite. I wanted to at least bring some meaning to the conversation. I thought that this was my punk rock.

Read More

joeyx:

On this day, March 16th, in 1926: Sgt. Stubby died in Washington, DC after a life in service to his Country.
Stubby was the most decorated dog of WWI and was promoted from Private to Sargent in the field. He was wounded twice, able to sniff out gas before the soldiers, single handedly captured a German soldier, and was able to locate wounded Americans. He met three Presidents and when the GIs liberated a French town, the thankful women made him a chamois coat to pin his medals on to.
Oh, and when his owner went to Georgetown, Sgt. Stubby became the Hoya’s mascot and would go onto the field during halftime and nose a football around while the fans cheered. He also got to lead a lot of Veteran Day parades and has a stone in the WWI memorial that notes that he is a “very brave stray.”
Today’s hero: Sgt. Stubby!

joeyx:

On this day, March 16th, in 1926: Sgt. Stubby died in Washington, DC after a life in service to his Country.

Stubby was the most decorated dog of WWI and was promoted from Private to Sargent in the field. He was wounded twice, able to sniff out gas before the soldiers, single handedly captured a German soldier, and was able to locate wounded Americans. He met three Presidents and when the GIs liberated a French town, the thankful women made him a chamois coat to pin his medals on to.

Oh, and when his owner went to Georgetown, Sgt. Stubby became the Hoya’s mascot and would go onto the field during halftime and nose a football around while the fans cheered. He also got to lead a lot of Veteran Day parades and has a stone in the WWI memorial that notes that he is a “very brave stray.”

Today’s hero: Sgt. Stubby!